Archive for April, 2008

RepRap – The coolest thing since amoebas began replicating

Tuesday, April 29th, 2008

Check out the project to create an open source self replicating 3d printer. I’m not kidding:

reprap.org

I don’t have the skills to build it myself, at least not without a lot more work then I want. Looking at the site, it seems for 400$ or so (look at the site for actual numbers) you can build a rapid prototyper which also happens to be self replicating, as long as you don’t include all the metal and silicon bits. It can still do a lot – for instance make a cup in which to celebrate the newly minted machine!

(on a side note, I’m fed up with NetworkManager breaking all the time on my ubuntu, and finally learned how to create a mapping in /etc/network/interfaces – http://wiki.saymoo.org/DebianNetworking)

Meme me

Tuesday, April 29th, 2008

Everybody’s doing it, so here goes: on amber:

history|awk ‘{a[$2]++ } END{for(i in a){print a[i] ” ” i}}’ |sort -rn|head

107 cd
100 ls
73 git
14 cat
13 vim
11 less
9 sudo
8 texmacs
8 mv
7 ./src/GeoXPlanet.py

on root@rolf: (yes, it’s a laptop, and I don’t use NetworkManager)

51 ping
50 ifconfig
43 ifup
35 ifdown
33 iwconfig
30 ls
29 dmesg
27 cd
25 iwlist
19 apt-get

but as a normal user:

121 cd
116 ls
45 git
22 cat
16 sudo
14 make
14 ipython
11 ssh
9 vim
9 sed

Yes, these history files are a little short. Let’s do this again next year!

The last lecture

Monday, April 21st, 2008

I just read the book, by Randy Pausch. It is very moving, as things like that usually are to me. But very uplifting too. I guess it would be best just to give a few pointers from the book, since I’m not that good at rehashing stuff, even if I just read them and they are fresh in my mind.

What is the book about, and why should you follow those links? It’s about someone who has been diagnosed with terminal cancer and knows he has 6 months to live. It is about “How to accomplish your childhood dreams”. It is about what makes life worth living. And it is also about python. Ok, it isn’t about python, but it does mention it in one of the pages. Java is also mentioned, to be frank. Alice is too (www.alice.org).

First there is the books site, www.thelastlecture.com

The author’s main site, with the video of the last lecture given in CMU, and also a video about time management by same, Randy Pauch home page. You can find a blog there with day by day updates too.

A very good essay about statistics that are in fact good to know, and not just lies^3:  The Median Isn’t the Message by Stephen Jay Gould

Changing location with dnsmasq

Friday, April 4th, 2008

Recently I have been working on a new site, citytree. I’m doing some of the work on my laptop (asus eee 4g surf), I am sometimes in the same network as my repository (git through ssh), and sometimes on an external network. Previously I would go to the .git/config or .git/remotes and change the address before git push/git pull. That gets tiresome quick, and it isn’t even remotely the correct solution. The solution is to get the same name to resolve to two different ip’s, one when you are local and another when you aren’t. The way I did it, and the correct way I think (unless someone tells me otherwise), is through the dns server giving different responses. Since I already use dnsmaq, anyone with a dhcp lease is resolved correctly. So I switched the git server to be dhcp’d, told dnsmasq to give it the ip address which was previously static, and voila. This also means I’ve got a single dnsmasq.conf file to handle all the ip’s in my network, a big plus. In addition I made sure the same fqdn translated to the public ip I have (the same ip you’re reading this from), and now I have what I wanted!